46th European Rotorcraft Forum

Moscow, 8-11 September

Awards

Ian Cheeseman Award

The Cheeseman Award for Best Paper prepared for and presented at the European Rotorcraft Forum ERF has been established to recognize the author(s) who has/have prepared and presented the most significant technical paper as judged and selected by his/her peers. While the quality of the archived paper is paramount in the selection process, the quality of the presentation of the material at the Forum must also be taken into account. The selected paper is presented at the next Forum of the American Helicopter Society AHS.

The award consists of a plaque from the European Rotorcraft Forum and an honorarium that will pay for travel by one author from a point within Europe to the site of the AHS Forum. The Honorarium is provided by the subject national organizing committee. Complimentary registration and accommodations for the selected author are provided by the AHS.

The Padfield Award has been established to recognize the author(s) not older than 30 years of age who has/have prepared and presented the most significant technical paper as judged and selected by his/her peers. The award consists of a plaque from the European Rotorcraft Forum.

While the quality of the archived paper is paramount in the selection process, the quality of the presentation of the material at the Forum is also taken into account.

Gareth Padfield Award

Padfield’s long and distinguished career as a research scientist and professor has been instrumental in establishing and expanding the analytic boundaries in many rotorcraft areas, including flight handling qualities of helicopters and tilt rotor aircraft, simulator fidelity, helicopter/ship dynamic interface modeling, and analysis techniques to help define and explain the complexities of both helicopter and human pilot behavior measured in flight test. In his innovative approach to flight control, Padfield has drawn on the understandings of visual perception in the natural world to explain how pilots guide and stabilize aircraft.

Padfield received his Bachelor of Science in aeronautical engineering at the University of London (Queen Mary College) in 1969. Padfield’s eventual research focus was defined very early, with his prize winning final year project, “The Strongly Controlled Aircraft,” published in the Aeronautical Quarterly in 1971. Padfield completed his PhD in late 1976 and joined the Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE) Bedford in the Helicopter Division. During his 23-year career at the RAE (later the Defence Evaluation and Research Agency, DERA), he specialized in helicopter flight research, engaged in flight test, modeling and flight simulation, handling qualities and flight control developments.

Padfield took up the James Bibby Chair in Aerospace Engineering at The University of Liverpool in August 1999, creating the Flight Science and Technology Research Group. He was Aerospace Programme Director until 2006, more than doubling the undergraduate student intake in this period. In August 2004, he was appointed Head of the Department of Engineering, including the disciplines of Aerospace, Mechanical, Materials Science, Manufacturing, Design and Civil Engineering, where he exercised skills in balance and compromise. Padfield’s research interests include flight handling qualities and control, modeling and simulation and the flight dynamics of fixed and rotary wing aircraft. At Liverpool, he has taught Aircraft Performance and Rotorcraft Flight and introduced a new problem-based-learning module, Flight Handling Qualities, into the final year of the Aerospace Masters program at Liverpool.

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